Dye Free medication options

Did you realize that many commercial medications contain dyes, preservatives, excipients?  No one really expects the dye used in the products that we consume to cause any significant health consequences. These additives that make our foods, drinks, and medications aesthetically pleasing have the potential to do more harm without any added benefits. Businesses understand that most consumers eat with their eyes first. Before we put anything into our mouths, it has to be visually appealing. Many consumables have started using naturally derived colorants, but unfortunately there are still a lot of products that continue to use synthetic dyes. Synthetic dye ingestion has been linked with allergy, sensitivity, hyperactivity in children, and even cancer in rats.
In 1906, the Pure Food and Drugs Act instituted the first restrictions on color additives in the United States. The law basically banned the adding of synthetic dyes that proved to be injurious to health. During that time there were around 80 existing dyes used, compared to today where the number has since dropped down to 7. Over the years more and more coloring additives have been banned because of its dangerous health consequences. The remaining dyes used in the U.S. today are still being tested for its safety.

Dyes are often added to medications so that an off-colored mess can look more appealing to ingest. There isn’t really any other purpose aside from that. Having dyes in our medications, we risk, and our children risk taking a medication that can cause a sensitivity reaction, allergic reaction, or worse. Luckily, many of the commercially available medications on the market can be compounded by pharmacies, like Johnson Compounding & Wellness,  without the use of dyes. Taking dye-free preparations eliminate the risk of developing negative health consequences associated with taking dye containing medications.
If you currently receive compounding medication, consider going dye free today.  Please call or drop in today to speak with one of our pharmacists about medication that can be made dye free!

4 thoughts on “Dye Free medication options”

  1. Hello
    I am currently taking the BRAND Zoloft 25mg and have developed lichen planus… I personally feel it is a reaction to the dye or fillers in the medicine because if at any time the medication is stuck in my throat it causes a severe burning. Are you able to compound the BRAND? The generic sertraline has never worked for me although I tried several times including the liquid.

    1. We can compound this using the pure sertraline powder using a hypoallergenic filler and dye free. If we used the brand to compound with, we cannot avoid the dyes/fillers that are in the manufactured product.
      Thank You
      Omar Allibhai
      PharmD, RPh, FACA, FIACP

  2. I am very fortunate to be able to receive my medications from the VA. With that said I have been given many prescriptions for prostrate, high blood pressure, & cholesterol. I have progressively experienced drier skin issues to the point I am constantly itching. I have applied every topical the VA has prescribed and many over the counter purchases in hopes of relief. This past week I had a dermatology appointment (waited 2 months for) and she immediately looked at my medication list and told me I was probably reacting to the dyes and would consult my primary to eliminate ones with dyes. Wow, I have though for a long time my issue was something I had been ingesting. I have a follow up appointment with my primary at 2 tomorrow. Two months ago I saw a allergist doctor, Her only indication was allergies to trees and grass, but directed me to a dermatology consult.

    1. Thanks for your comment. Please feel free to call one of our knowledgeable pharmacists and they can answer any questions that you may have. #781-893-3870.

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